Tag: cyber attacks

Shellshock Exploit Exposes Millions of Servers to Hackers

Remember Heartbleed, that age-old bug that only surfaced last year and left more than half of all internet servers around the world exposed? Looks like we might have yet another Heartbleed on our hands. This one has been codenamed Shellshock and experts are already saying that it could impact millions of Unix systems that operate on Linux or Mac IOS. And may even threaten consumer devices including home routers.

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Keep Your Shields Up For PoS And Other Malware

It’s been a good time for malware and its authors, but a very bad time for businesses and especially those caught in a malware snare. A variety of point of sale (PoS) malware has run rampant through thousands of business and retailers in just the last few months, creating a massive haul of stolen credentials for hackers worldwide. And making consumers a very nervous bunch.

The latest victim is Home Depot, which only just announced that it had lost at least 56 million customer credit and debit cards to hackers who used a variant of PoS malware that’s growing in popularity amongst criminals — because it apparently works very well.

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10 Easy Ways To Prevent A Data Breach

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Did you know that there was an average of one data breach every single day in the U.S. last year? That more than 800 million records were exposed in data breaches last year? Or that the average cost of a data breach is now a staggering $3.5 million?

These are not statistics you want to be part of or costs you want to incur. So remember the following tips as part of your breach prevention program:

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10 Ways to Defend Against Cyber Risks

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  1. Look in the window. Most business owners look at their websites and security risks from the inside-out, and never see what it looks like from a hacker’s perspective. Even a cursory inspection, but even better a basic website scan, could easily help you spot vulnerabilities quickly.
  2. Understand what the risks are. After all, you can’t fix them if you don’t know what they are. A little light reading on common business and website risks could tell you all you need to know. Focus on technical and procedural risks – from exploits of unpatched vulnerabilities to common errors by employees.
  3. Focus on passwords, and especially to your FTP account. Passwords can be the keys to the kingdom, and even the biggest security breaches at the biggest businesses have been traced to the smallest password mistakes.
  4. If your business has a lot of sensitive information to protect, consider having your website developers use a dedicated computer to access the website. This can significantly reduce the risks of things like keyloggers, which can steal website passwords and give hackers access. By using a dedicated computer that’s not used for anything else, you eliminate the risk of downloading a keylogger or other malware through drive-by downloads, email attachments, or infected files.
  5. Create a list of your Top 10 security rules, that everyone has to follow, and make that everyone knows what those rules are. Ten is a good number. You could easily have a hundred but too many could cause more harm than good. Focus on the biggest risks and vulnerabilities and pursue them relentlessly.
  6. If you accept credit cards, make sure you’re PCI compliant. Achieving PCI compliance is not difficult or expensive, especially for smaller businesses. Not only is PCI a great security place to start, you don’t have an option. Failure could mean big fines and the inability to accept credit card payments.
  7. Don’t forget to get physical. Not all attacks or exploits have to be digital or virtual. Hackers can walk into an unprotected business or rummage through a dumpster. And many of the information-rich laptops and tablets stolen in burglaries end up in the hands of cybercrooks.
  8. Control who you give access to. That can range from access to buildings and rooms to access to computers, networks, and websites, to access to specific files and privileges. It’s not about people getting access to sensitive data, it’s about the wrong people getting access.
  9. Choose your web hosting provider carefully. There are thousands to choose from so pick yours thoughtfully and focus on what they say about security. If they don’t talk about it at all, that could be a warning sign. If they do mention security, present them with your list of top security worries and risks and see what their response is.
  10. Review your security regularly, with a comprehensive top-down review at least a couple of times annually. Nothing stands still, and new vulnerabilities are being discovered or created daily.

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Out With the Old, In With the Old

out_with_the_oldOh what a year it was for insecurity, and especially for the small business. It wasn’t as though we didn’t already know – that small businesses were firmly in the crosshairs of hackers of all shades. But early in the year Verizon put the final stamp on it. In its annual Data Breach Investigations Report, published at the beginning of 2013, Verizon revealed that businesses with fewer than 100 employees made up the single largest group of victims of data breaches. That conclusion was supported by other security studies around the same time that found small businesses suffered the most cyber attacks.

Perhaps the single biggest and most dangerous change in threats came in the world of malware delivery. For years, hackers and malware authors had used the same ways to deliver and spread their malware. Email and spam were by far the most popular. It was easy to buy hundreds of millions of email addresses, pack them with phishing messages, and attach a nasty malware payload.

And even if most users didn’t fall for the scam, even a small percentage of hundreds of millions was enough to make the attacks very lucrative for criminals. But as more users got the message, and began to grow more reluctant to open email attachments they weren’t expecting, many thought the malware industry was on its last legs. After all, how else could you get the goods to market?

So hackers had to choose a new way to deliver and spread malware. And they found it in small business websites. Every month, thousands of poorly protected websites are hijacked by hackers who use vulnerabilities in these sites to install malware. That malware is then spread to visitors to those websites, as well as attack other websites, and so continue the spread of malware.

And if you think that simply relying on antivirus software will get you through safely, there’s some more bad news. Some reports have suggested that today’s antivirus software can detect very few of the most dangerous types of malware – the stuff you really want to avoid. And the New York Times can testify to that. Early in 2013, Chinese hackers were easily able to breach the extensive defenses the Times had in place. Out of 45 different types of malware the Chinese used to attack the newspaper, the Times’ own security and virus protection detected only one.

But Chinese hackers weren’t just targeting big businesses like the New York Times. In September, the Huffington Post reported that Chinese hackers were actively targeting small businesses in the U.S., from pizza restaurants to medical clinics.

According to the Huffington Post, “The hackers find computer systems to take over by using tools that scan the web for Internet-connected PCs with software vulnerabilities they can exploit. Small businesses are popular targets because they often have lax security.”

And the year didn’t end too well either. When security researchers discovered more than 2 million stolen passwords on a hacker server in December, a piece of malware called a keylogger was suspected. That very same week, other security researchers found that out of 44 popular antivirus products tested, only one was able to detect a keylogger.

Which probably explains why an estimated $5 billion was siphoned from U.S. bank accounts in 2012 by cybercrooks using malware like keyloggers. And if any of those were business accounts, the business owners were probably on the hook for all the losses.

So safe to say (no pun intended) that 2013 was not a good year for business security, and especially for small business security. And we don’t predict much improvement over the next twelve months. It’s now clear that small businesses are the favorite target for the worst kinds of hackers. Whether it’s to steal your personal and customer information, break into your bank account, or use your website to host a variety of very dangerous malware, your small business may be getting all the wrong attention from all the wrong visitors.

So let’s make 2014 the year you take back your security and peace of mind. Security isn’t hard, no matter how sophisticated hackers and their tools have become. There are plenty of ways you can protect your business and your website, and make it just hard enough for hackers to decide that you’re just not worth the effort and that they should move on to small businesses that are doing little about security. It’s like locking your car and closing the windows while being parked next to a convertible with the top down. The easy target gets attacked first, and you’re at least lower on the radar by showing your security awareness.

If you make just one security choice this year, make it your website. Securing your website is simple and affordable, and yet it’s the single best way to protect your business, your customers, and any visitors to your site. And you’ll also help slow the spread of malware to other users and sites, which is one in the eye for the bad guys.

And remember that as a SiteLock customer you get more than prevention. SiteLock will work with you to address any website security issues that crop up, including malware removal, if any is detected on your site. And as always, our security advice – the best in the business – is always free, and we are here around the clock whenever you need support.

If you’re a frequent reader of this blog, then you’ll know that our expertise and advice goes far beyond just protecting your website. All good security has to be holistic, which is why we offer no-nonsense advice on a variety of security topics that can impact your business, from security policies and planning, to employee education, malware prevention, data privacy and security, and much more.

Our goal for 2014 is to be the best security partner for online businesses. We hope that, even if SiteLock is not your chosen security provider, website security is on your list of goals for 2014 as well.

Google Author: Neal O’Farrell

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