Tag: hackers

12daysofxmas

12 Days of Christmas Brought to You by SiteLock [Video]

Merry Christmas! In the spirit of the season, we’ve created a satirical rendition of the 12 Days of Christmas to educate website owners about online risks. Watch the video to learn some of the most common “gifts” cybercriminals are giving away this year.

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Getting to Know the Criminal Hacking Your Website

The holiday season has begun and consumers are ready to shop. Retailers are stocking up on inventory, staffing for long hours and preparing for a busy quarter. As you go through your checklist to make sure your company is ready for the holidays, it’s crucial to double check your website’s security to ensure your business remains safe.

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Is It Time For Mandated Website Security?

website security tipsWe’re now closing in on nearly one billion websites worldwide, and with another 6 million new domains being registered daily. Yet it’s estimated that less than 3% of those websites are secure. And guess who’s really taking notice of this glaring absence of website security?

It’s nothing new that hackers are constantly changing their tactics. What’s troubling is how quickly they adapt and adjust to whatever security countermeasures they encounter, and how creative and sophisticated their workarounds have become. That’s what happens when a crime becomes a lucrative industry, and when things like website security get overlooked hackers won’t waste a moment exploiting it.

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Shellshock Exploit Exposes Millions of Servers to Hackers

Remember Heartbleed, that age-old bug that only surfaced last year and left more than half of all internet servers around the world exposed? Looks like we might have yet another Heartbleed on our hands. This one has been codenamed Shellshock and experts are already saying that it could impact millions of Unix systems that operate on Linux or Mac IOS. And may even threaten consumer devices including home routers.

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10 Ways To Keep Hackers Away From Your Data

  1. moneydownthedrainDon’t keep what you don’t need. Most businesses hang on to too much data for too long. And it’s often data that they don’t need. Or worse, didn’t realize they even had. So do a spring-cleaning. Do an inventory of all your data and everywhere you keep it. Identify what you don’t need, then get rid of it forever. And not by simply hitting the Delete key, but overwriting it to military standards or shredding it. When it comes to data breaches, you can’t lose what you don’t have.
  2. What you do keep, know where it is. So many data breaches result from data being in the wrong place at the wrong time. Like highly sensitive customer or employee information being carried around town or across the world on an unprotected laptop. As part of your inventory you need to know where your data is at all times so that you can protect it at all times. That means checking servers, desktops, laptops, websites, tablets, phones, removable storage, filing cabinets, storage lockers, warehouses, third parties and anywhere else it might be hiding.
  3. Classify your information. Not all information is created equal. And understanding that you can’t protect all data all the time, you have to focus on the stuff that’s worth protecting. That’s where data classification comes in. There are a number of different ways to classify data, but they’re usually a series of three to five categories of importance – from top secret to simply private and confidential. By assigning a security classification to your data, you make it easier for employees to instantly understand how they need to handle that data.
  4. Encrypt. In most states, you get an almost free pass on data breaches if the breached data was encrypted. That’s how good encryption is at making data useless to hackers. Encryption is getting much easier to implement and afford. Encryption isn’t just for credit cards and online transactions. In any business you can easily encrypt files, folders, hard drives, texts, phone calls and emails, photos and videos, and just about any kind of data.
  5. Comply with PCI. The credit card companies are pretty good when it comes to protecting information, which is why PCI compliance is a great baseline. It’s not perfect and not a guarantee, but you should never be without it.
  6. Lock down your website. Many of today’s breaches start with the exploitation of poorly protected and patched websites. Which is really a shame because it’s so easy to protect your website. Make sure you’re using some kind of web scanning or monitoring service that will find and fix security holes before hackers do.
  7. Turn every employee into a data sentry. Technology only goes so far when it comes to preventing data breaches. People fill that gap, and the most important people are your employees. Every employee needs to understand the value of data, the risks of breaches, and how their choices can make all the difference
  8. Try not to move it. If you know where your data is and you don’t plan to move it any time soon, then it’s very easy to lock it in place. But data is at its most vulnerable when it’s on the move – like stored on a traveling laptop or phone, sent on tape to a third party like a payroll processor, or even being emailed between employees.
  9. Don’t forget paper records. It’s estimated that one in every five data breaches involves paper records. That means documents stolen from a briefcase or in a burglary, dumped without shredding, or simply mislaid. So as part of your inventory you need to go through the piles of information in every office, pick what you have no more need for, and shred it.
  10. Use layers of security. While antivirus software is important, it’s not enough. While website security is essential, it’s not enough. While good passwords are a must, still not enough. Hackers after your data are relying on the fact that you might be relying on just one or two layers of security between them and your data. Good security is about creating multiple security perimeters that convince hackers that you’re just not worth their time and energy.

Google Author: Neal O’Farrell

Russian Hackers Caught With 1 Billion+ Stolen Passwords

Russian hackersSeems like just about everyone thought that the massive Target data breach earlier this year would be the biggest for a while. Yet only a matter of weeks later, eBay announced a data breach that was even bigger.

Now we’re learning of a hacker haul that makes those earlier breaches look like chump change. Security researchers in Milwaukee revealed that they’ve been monitoring a hacking gang operating from a small Russian town, and found the gang had managed to amass a database of more than 1.5 billion stolen credentials.

Here’s just a sample of what the investigators learned about the hackers, and the implications of their haul:

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The Hidden Dangers In Website Images

Image is important in business, because so much of your business is about your image. Same thing goes for your website. The images you use to support the content on your website, including your social media, have to be chosen carefully.

You need to choose images that support the content you’re publishing and the message you’re promoting. You need to choose images that are appropriate for your audiences because you don’t want to offend anyone. And of course you need to choose images that you have permission to use. Using unlicensed images can cost you thousands of dollars in fines, even if they were put on your website years ago by a third-party web designer.

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Santa’s Reply to a Letter from a Security-Concerned Website

Dear Website,

Santa's reply to a security-concerned websiteWell, I’m not really sure where to begin. Not only was it the first time I’ve received a letter asking me for security for Christmas, but also the very first letter I’ve ever received from a website. And trust me, I’ve been doing this for quite a while, long before that internet thingy I started for Al Gore.

I am very sorry to hear how worried you are about security, and especially hackers and malware. Not really for yourself, but for your owner. I know that most business owners are so busy building their dream, they sometimes forget that there are some very bad people out there who can too easily steal it all.

I have to admit, I wasn’t really sure where to start. If you’d asked me for a Kindle or an “i” something-or- other, or even just a toy or a scarf, that would be easy. But I feel a little like most business owners do, not really knowing how to protect you and even where to start.

But when I had some downtime on my sleigh (don’t worry – it has cruise control, so it was perfectly safe), I did some research and I hope you’ll be happy with what I came up with.

So here goes:

You said you wanted someone to watch over you. Well, while I’d love to be able to do that, you understand I have my own full-time job, even in the off-season. So I sent your owner a very nice letter advising her that the best thing she could do for herself (and for you) was to sign up for SiteLock so that you aren’t so vulnerable to all those hackers and malware removal is automatic.

I love giving gifts like that. They’re not extravagant so there’s no need to feel guilty. They’re very simple to use, so your owner doesn’t have to spend her holidays poring over an instruction manual or looking for batteries. And once you switch it on, SiteLock will guard you and your business around the clock, from the most advanced threats and determined hackers.

So what was next? Oh yes, better passwords. I hear that. It’s a nightmare for my toy business. Who knew so many employees, elves especially, are so careless with important passwords? Like FTP. I mean, why have a lock on the front door of your business if you insist on leaving the keys in it?

But I’ve got you covered. I sent every employee a password manager (don’t worry, some of the best are free). Now they can create and protect the most complex of passwords, and store them all in one safe place. So not being able to remember all those big and clumsy passwords is no excuse. And some of these programs will even remind you when it’s time to update your passwords, so forgetting is not an issue either.

Let me see, what else did you ask for? Sorry, my memory isn’t what it used to be. Oh yes, you wanted to get rid of all that outdated content and code on your website because you think it’s slowing you down. Tell me about. Every year about this time, when the rush dies down, we promise to tidy up the place so that we can run more efficiently as we prepare for next year.

And every year that resolution goes out the door as quick as Christmas itself. Not to worry. I created a special note just for your webmaster. In exchange for his list, I gave him a list, too. It’s pretty simple. I told him to go through every page of the site and remove any outdated content and images, and clean up or remove outdated code — we all know how dangerous that can be.

I also told him to get a patching and updating regimen in place so that all critical patches are installed as soon as they’re available, and outdated software and plugins don’t leave you vulnerable.

I think that’s it. Hope I’m not missing anything. When I think about it, I wish every website would send me a letter like this. I can easily find their owners and lean on them a little. I mean, if this is the season of goodwill and joy, why shouldn’t it start with your website, the face of your business?

Google Author: Neal O’Farrell

Celebrate National Website Security Month

OK, so there’s no such thing. But guess what? It’s still October, which means it’s still National Cyber Security Awareness Month. Close enough, right? That also means there’s still plenty of time to focus on the security housekeeping that’s crucial to the success and survival of your web presence.

Security is like profit – it’s not an option. And that’s even more important to remember if you rely heavily on your website, either to promote your business or to process orders.

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