Tag: holiday shopping online

12daysofxmas

“The Twelve Days of Christmas” for the Hacked (or At-risk) Websites

As you may have noticed, we see the biggest shopping season of the year as the biggest risk season too — at least for online threats. Let’s face it – most of us shop (and many of us sell) online to avoid the long lines and hustle of the crowds, and to make it easy for our customers.

In sticking with the theme of online shopping (and keeping your business and customers safe while doing so), being protected from hackers, and even hearing the website’s story in its letter to Santa practically begging for some attention, we are introducing a fun and informative video about some very real risks that website owners face, and what they mean for their online business. At a time when they can least afford to be exposed.

The content in this custom rendition of “The Twelve Days of Christmas” video is created entirely for educational purposes, taking the approach that even in risky times, awareness is the best form of prevention. A little fun never hurt (so we use that too), but what you don’t know can hurt you, so please be safe!

Enjoy the video! And caring is sharing – so tell your friends!

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Google+ author: Lindsay Berman

Happy Cyber (crime) Monday!

Cyber MondayHappy Cyber Monday! If your website has survived the Thanksgiving rush, let’s hope it doesn’t suffer from a post-Thanksgiving malware hangover. Because in the usual run up to Christmas, the only people busier than elves are hackers. And their favorite tool this year appears to be malware. What’s a website to do without trusted malware removal?

We took a look at many of the top security stories to hit the headlines in just the last couple of weeks, and it’s not surprising that most of them were about malware.

Security firm Symantec says that hackers have recently been very successful in delivering a nasty gift of malware to unsuspecting users by blasting out emails pretending to be antivirus software updates. What makes the emails so convincing, according to Symantec, is that they look very authentic and incorporate logos from most of the popular antivirus products – probably even those that you use. Because most users are likely to be familiar with the brands and use at least one of them, it makes the email appear more personal and genuine. And therefore more likely to be opened. And clicked – which is what causes the most damage.

Security firm Trusteer also announced that it discovered some of the most advanced financial malware yet, malware that not only has more features than any previous malware, but also creates a private and secure communications channel back to the hackers behind it. According to Trusteer, the malware can steal information entered into web forms as well as steal log-in credentials from dozens of the most popular FTP clients.

And this is especially dangerous to small businesses in the U.S. If this malware is able to steal the login and password for your business bank account, it will very quickly empty that account. And small business accounts are not protected by zero liability. So if the thieves steal every last dime you have in the bank account, you’re out of luck. And maybe even out of business.

To add to the misery, Trend Micro also reported that it discovered more than 200,000 different types of malware targeted at online banking in just the third quarter of this year, with at least 25% of them targeted at U.S. banks.

One of the most dangerous pieces of malware in circulation right now is Cryptolocker. This is ransomware. Once it infects your computer, it will encrypt or lock your files and then demand a ransom to unlock them so you can use them again. The ransom can vary, from $300 to more than $3,000. And even if you pay the ransom, chances are you still won’t get your data back. And thousands of users have fallen victim. Even one police department admitted that Cryptolocker had managed to kidnap their data.

And not to be left out, researchers have discovered that even the NSA has turned to malware to do their job, infecting at least 50,000 with a botnet that will allow them to spy on those computers.

So if website malware scanning and defense is not on your Holiday to-do list, it might be a good time to update that list. After all, it’s supposed to be the season of cheer.

Google Author: Neal O’Farrell

As shoppers prepare for Thanksgiving, Black Friday and Cyber Monday, so do hackers. And so should you.

Online shoppingEvery day is an important day for business, and especially for security. While most shoppers sleep, hackers never do, and it only takes one day or one vulnerability to mess a whole lot of things up for your online business.

As Thanksgiving weekend approaches, your customers may be gearing up to make some big purchases. And how safe and secure they feel about your website could determine how much of their hard-earned cash will end up in your pocket.

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PCI Compliance Could Be The Best Christmas Gift For Your Business – And Your Customers

giftData has always been a currency for crooks but, now more than ever, personal data has become a hot commodity for everyone from petty identity thieves to major organized crime. And one of the easiest ways to get this kind of information is from websites just like yours.

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Spread Cheer or Spread Infection This Holiday Season. The Choice is Yours.

If you really love your customers (and who doesn’t?), then the last thing you want to give them when they visit your website is an infection, right? But that’s exactly what you could be doing if you haven’t taken measures to prevent your website from becoming a malware watering hole.

A watering hole, or water hole, is a website with vulnerabilities that hackers take advantage of to plant malware. The idea is that the malware simply lies in wait until someone visits your website, and if that someone is not using protection, he or she will find their computer or smartphone infected with that malware.

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