Tag: protect your online business

ftc protecting small businesses

New Government Website Highlights Small Business Cybersecurity Risks

The US Federal Trade Commission (FTC) recently launched a new website aimed at educating small business owners on the risks of cybercrime and the steps they can take to protect their business.

“Small businesses are critical to our economic strength, building America’s future, and helping the United States compete in today’s global marketplace,” said FTC Acting Chairman Maureen Ohlhausen. “This innovative new website is a one-stop shop where small businesses can find information to protect themselves from scammers and hackers, as well as resources they can use if they are hit with a cyberattack.”

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12daysofxmas

“The Twelve Days of Christmas” for the Hacked (or At-risk) Websites

As you may have noticed, we see the biggest shopping season of the year as the biggest risk season too — at least for online threats. Let’s face it – most of us shop (and many of us sell) online to avoid the long lines and hustle of the crowds, and to make it easy for our customers.

In sticking with the theme of online shopping (and keeping your business and customers safe while doing so), being protected from hackers, and even hearing the website’s story in its letter to Santa practically begging for some attention, we are introducing a fun and informative video about some very real risks that website owners face, and what they mean for their online business. At a time when they can least afford to be exposed.

The content in this custom rendition of “The Twelve Days of Christmas” video is created entirely for educational purposes, taking the approach that even in risky times, awareness is the best form of prevention. A little fun never hurt (so we use that too), but what you don’t know can hurt you, so please be safe!

Enjoy the video! And caring is sharing – so tell your friends!

12days

 

 

Google+ author: Lindsay Berman

Happy Cyber (crime) Monday!

Cyber MondayHappy Cyber Monday! If your website has survived the Thanksgiving rush, let’s hope it doesn’t suffer from a post-Thanksgiving malware hangover. Because in the usual run up to Christmas, the only people busier than elves are hackers. And their favorite tool this year appears to be malware. What’s a website to do without trusted malware removal?

We took a look at many of the top security stories to hit the headlines in just the last couple of weeks, and it’s not surprising that most of them were about malware.

Security firm Symantec says that hackers have recently been very successful in delivering a nasty gift of malware to unsuspecting users by blasting out emails pretending to be antivirus software updates. What makes the emails so convincing, according to Symantec, is that they look very authentic and incorporate logos from most of the popular antivirus products – probably even those that you use. Because most users are likely to be familiar with the brands and use at least one of them, it makes the email appear more personal and genuine. And therefore more likely to be opened. And clicked – which is what causes the most damage.

Security firm Trusteer also announced that it discovered some of the most advanced financial malware yet, malware that not only has more features than any previous malware, but also creates a private and secure communications channel back to the hackers behind it. According to Trusteer, the malware can steal information entered into web forms as well as steal log-in credentials from dozens of the most popular FTP clients.

And this is especially dangerous to small businesses in the U.S. If this malware is able to steal the login and password for your business bank account, it will very quickly empty that account. And small business accounts are not protected by zero liability. So if the thieves steal every last dime you have in the bank account, you’re out of luck. And maybe even out of business.

To add to the misery, Trend Micro also reported that it discovered more than 200,000 different types of malware targeted at online banking in just the third quarter of this year, with at least 25% of them targeted at U.S. banks.

One of the most dangerous pieces of malware in circulation right now is Cryptolocker. This is ransomware. Once it infects your computer, it will encrypt or lock your files and then demand a ransom to unlock them so you can use them again. The ransom can vary, from $300 to more than $3,000. And even if you pay the ransom, chances are you still won’t get your data back. And thousands of users have fallen victim. Even one police department admitted that Cryptolocker had managed to kidnap their data.

And not to be left out, researchers have discovered that even the NSA has turned to malware to do their job, infecting at least 50,000 with a botnet that will allow them to spy on those computers.

So if website malware scanning and defense is not on your Holiday to-do list, it might be a good time to update that list. After all, it’s supposed to be the season of cheer.

Google Author: Neal O’Farrell

Web Application Firewall and Content Delivery Network – A Double Whammy for Hackers

double_whammyDoes your website have a bouncer, and if not, why not? Think about it. Websites are being probed by hackers millions of times every day, using sophisticated and automated hacking tools looking for any vulnerabilities they can exploit. It’s like having a store on Main Street that’s swarmed with visitors every single day, only you can’t tell which customers are going to pay you and which ones are going to shoplift.

A web application firewall, or WAF, is like a bouncer for your website. It stands between you and the street and determines based on a variety of criteria who gets in and who’s kicked out. It acts like a kind of filter to make sure the visitors to your online store don’t mean you any harm.

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To WAF or Not to WAF? Part 3: More on TrueShield

Who is visiting my website: Good bots, bad bots, and humans (oh my!)

There are two basic categories of traffic that visit your website – humans and (ro)bots. An invaluable benefit of the TrueShield web application firewall is being able to differentiate, not only between these two basic groups, but also to separate the good bots from the bad. Bots get a bad rap, since most people associate them with cyber attacks. But if it weren’t for the search engines using bots to index your website, your site would never appear in a search and all your SEO efforts would be wasted. These are the good bots, and if your website application firewall is blocking them you could be hurting your online business instead of protecting it. SiteLock ensures that these bots are able to access your site and do their job for you. Knowing more about your visitors also enables you to spend smarter when it comes to marketing dollars, and to provide your advertisers with the most accurate numbers.  When it comes to your website traffic (and, well, pretty much everything else in life), knowledge is power.

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Don’t Let a Trojan Disrupt Your Business

If you’re like most small business owners, you probably don’t believe that something as small as a piece of malware could threaten your business. After all, what could you possibly have that malware could want? And why would a hacker pick on you when they have so many bigger fish to go after?

Maybe this story will change your mind. A very small, nine-person business in southern California recently announced that it would have to close down suddenly and permanently after a small piece of malware known as a banking Trojan managed to slip on to the computer of one of its employees.

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To WAF or Not to WAF? Part 2: Introducing TrueShield

What is this TrueShield you speak of?

TrueShield is SiteLock’s web application firewall. It operates like your very own team of secret service agents, standing guard at every possible entry point on your website, 24/7. The TrueShield web application firewall inspects every visitor who tries to enter your site, denying access to the bad guys and bad bots, and welcoming the rest. You may imagine this would cause a traffic jam and slow down flow to your website – but it is actually just the opposite. The TrueShield WAF includes TrueSpeed, a content delivery network (CDN) which moves your website into the fast lane, loading your pages faster and improving your visitors’ experience – even boosting your SEO. It’s pretty remarkable stuff.

Who can use TrueShield?

Anyone who has a website. The TrueShield web application firewall is cloud-based, which means that it doesn’t require a complicated installation – in fact setup takes just a few minutes. It also means that TrueShield is affordable for even the smallest businesses and budgets. A typical small to mid-sized business does not have the in-house technical staff, nor the time, to deal with the complexities of protecting their site from every potential attacker. A web application firewall, like TrueShield, is the easiest way for a small business to get enterprise-grade protection without needing enterprise-level resources.

Google Author: Lindsay Berman

How to Protect My Website from Cybercrime

Website Security Podcast: SiteLock Interviewed on Blog Talk Radio

In a recent interview with Barry Moltz on Blog Talk Radio, Neill Feather, President of SiteLock, responds to the growing concern, particularly for small businesses, of website risks and how adding website security can protect online businesses and their reputation.

Website protection

Protect your website from hackers and cybercrime.

The fact is that small businesses are increasingly a prime target for cyber crime. Case in point – Neill references a recent study by Verizon that states that 95% of online businesses that are attacked by hackers have fewer than 100 employees. And the number of attacks continues to grow each day.

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