Tag: website speed

What is a content delivery network

What is a CDN?

If your website doesn’t load within 400 milliseconds – literally the blink of an eye – your visitors might leave. Take it from Amazon. In 2006 the online retailer analyzed its ratio of sales to its web performance and found that for every 100 millisecond delay in page load time, there was a 1% decrease in conversions.

Studies show that nearly 50% of consumers expect a web page to load in two seconds or less. So how can you increase your website’s speed? We suggest using a content delivery network (CDN).

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This Week in Exploits: Speeding Up Your WordPress Site

CDNs are great for WordPress sites because much of the post content is static and can easily be cached and served by a CDN. With visitors receiving cached content from the closest CDN data center, origin server load decreases, allowing sites to load faster for site visitors. At the same time, serving a site from multiple data centers makes the origin server more robust. A fortuitous spike in traffic won’t take a site down as the data centers handle the increased load.

Visit wpdistrict.sitelock.com for the full story.

How to Lose a Customer in Four Seconds

Remember the days when you could stop to make your morning coffee while waiting for a website to load? How about the times you wondered if your Internet was down because a picture took more than a few minutes to render? In the time it’s taken you to read this beautifully crafted intro, some websites will have lost precious traffic because their load time was over four seconds. Customers will wait — at most — 15 seconds, then leave your site and never come back. This may not seem like a big deal, but it has fiscal impacts on businesses of all sizes. Research by Kissmetrics revealed that even one second page delay could potentially cost businesses $2.5 million in sales every year.

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(Website) Speed is Good, But is It Secure?

We all want faster websites, no matter which side of the site we’re sitting on. Surfers want faster page loading times because they’re usually impatient and will quickly lose interest if the page appears to take more than a millisecond to load. And as a business owner, you should be concerned with speed too. You don’t want to lose valuable customers just because your website appears to be tranquilized.

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The Hidden Dangers In Website Images

Image is important in business, because so much of your business is about your image. Same thing goes for your website. The images you use to support the content on your website, including your social media, have to be chosen carefully.

You need to choose images that support the content you’re publishing and the message you’re promoting. You need to choose images that are appropriate for your audiences because you don’t want to offend anyone. And of course you need to choose images that you have permission to use. Using unlicensed images can cost you thousands of dollars in fines, even if they were put on your website years ago by a third-party web designer.

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A Website’s Letter to Santa

Dear Santa,

Letter to SantaThis is my first ever Christmas letter to you. I don’t like to ask for much, but I’m desperate. I’ve been a website for, gosh, going on three years now. Don’t get me wrong, I love my job. My owner’s great, new people visit me every day from all around the world, and my graphics are to die for. There’s never a dull moment, even when my owner is sleeping. Which of course, I never do.

But there’s a problem. My owner is so busy building the business, managing cash flow, and getting orders out the door, that she has little time for things like security. Especially website security. Besides, she has a degree in fine arts with a minor in philosophy and says she has no clue about things like websites and cybersecurity.

And that has left me feeling, well, vulnerable. Even a little naked. Which is not a good thing on the Internet when I’m completely exposed to so many strangers. Sometimes I wish I was invisible, it would be less embarrassing. But my owner really needs the website to showcase her work and generate online orders. And being blacklisted by the search engines would make her very upset. But I worry about what might happen if she doesn’t put everything else aside, just for a moment, and think about security.

With that in mind, here are just a few things that I would absolutely love this year. Not really for me, but for my owner. I’m doing all this for her, which I think is a very unselfish act. So I hope you’ll do your best to get me as many things on my list as you can.

Here goes.

  • First, I’d love someone to watch over me. I know where my weaknesses are but my owner doesn’t, and she doesn’t have the time to guard me every second of the day. So a website security or monitoring service would be just great. Everyone can sleep easier and I’ll feel much less naked and vulnerable.
  • A new password would be great. Would it be asking too much to ask for a new website password say, every three months? Maybe one with a number or two, or heaven forbid a special character!? That could significantly reduce the chances that hackers will guess or crack my password and have access to who knows what. And a strong, random, and well-protected password would be ideal. I mean, what good is a password if it doesn’t do its job very well. Not complaining or criticizing, just saying.
  • This might be asking too much, but any chance you could help me get rid of this stuff I’m not using anymore. I feel so bogged down lately with all this old, outdated code and images that no one even uses. It takes every bit of my energy to just load a simple page. I know I could be so much faster and lighter with just a bit of a clean-up  – I’ll be a whole new website, you’ll see!
  • I don’t want to sound selfish, but could I ask for a little something else for myself? Nothing fancy, but I’ve worked so hard all year I think it would help my spirits and confidence as we get ready for yet another year. Patches. I’d like some patches, or updates. I am up to my gills in all kinds of third-party programs that the web designer thought would be so very cool to burden me with. But he’s easily distracted and he’s forgotten about most of them. Now at least half of them have serious and known vulnerabilities that have never been patched or updated. And probably never will now because his latest “cool” thing is to make me mobile friendly, whatever that means. Another third-party app with a giant security hole, I’m betting. Oy.

Anyway, I hope I didn’t take up too much of your valuable time. And I hope you’ll see that what I’m asking for is not for me. It’s for my owner, her dreams, her employees, and all those customers who visit me. Please help.

Google author: Neal O’Farrell

Web Application Firewall and Content Delivery Network – A Double Whammy for Hackers

double_whammyDoes your website have a bouncer, and if not, why not? Think about it. Websites are being probed by hackers millions of times every day, using sophisticated and automated hacking tools looking for any vulnerabilities they can exploit. It’s like having a store on Main Street that’s swarmed with visitors every single day, only you can’t tell which customers are going to pay you and which ones are going to shoplift.

A web application firewall, or WAF, is like a bouncer for your website. It stands between you and the street and determines based on a variety of criteria who gets in and who’s kicked out. It acts like a kind of filter to make sure the visitors to your online store don’t mean you any harm.

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